Tell the USDA to ban the use of meat glue, and the FTC to stop allowing the lies about it on food labels!

Meat glue is actually an enzyme called transglutaminase, which is synthesized from the cultivation of bacteria or made from the blood plasma of pigs and cows. Companies use it to bind together scraps of meat that can then be sold as prime cuts. Strips of cheap meat are bound with the glue, refrigerated, and then sliced. The company that makes the meat glue, Ajinomoto, even illustrates how this can be accomplished to sell imitation “filet mignon.”

There are a number of dangers associated with meat glue.

Products using meat glue and sold in supermarkets must be labeled indicating that it has been “formed from pieces of whole muscle meat” or that it has been “reformed from a single cut." The language is deliberately evasive—we would call it a lie—and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) allows it to continue.

Tell the USDA to ban the use of meat glue, and the FTC to stop allowing the lies about it on food labels!

Recipients

  • Chairwoman Edith Ramirez, Chairwoman, Federal Trade Commission

Contact

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Message

Please reconsider your approval of meat glue

Dear [Decision Maker],

Sincerely,
[Your Name]
[Your Address]
[City, State ZIP]