Tell Congress Not to Slash Funding for Asthma Programs

Tuesday, May 3rd is World Asthma Day, a day to improve asthma awareness and care around the world.   Asthma is a significant public health program, and in the United States alone, more than 25 million people—including more than 7 million children—are living with asthma.  Every day, more than 9 people die from asthma. 

However, despite the continued need for investment in and attention to asthma, President Obama is proposing to merge the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Asthma Control Program with the Healthy Homes/Lead Poisoning Prevention Program—and then cut to their combined budgets by more than 50 percent!  In addition, at least half of the school-based asthma programs across the country will be eliminated. 

Please take a moment now to ask your senators and representative in Washington to save the National Asthma Control Program.

Slashing funding for the National Asthma Control Program would have a devastating effect on the work being done across the United States to save lives and help people live with their asthma.  Since it was created in 1999, the National Asthma Control Program has worked to coordinate the public health response to asthma control, making great strides in working through the states to collect data and ensuring patients understand how to manage their disease so they have fewer asthma attacks.  Since 1999, deaths and hospitalizations due to asthma have decreased even though the number of Americans diagnosed with asthma has risen.  

Please take a moment to send the attached letter to your state officials to ensure that CDC’s National Asthma Control Program remains a stand-alone program and receives an appropriation of $31 million for Fiscal Year 2012. 

Recipients

  • Your Senators
  • Your Representative

Contact

*Required fields
 
 

Message

Dear [Decision Maker],

I am writing to ask you to preserve the National Asthma Control Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as well as to maintain its funding at $31 million for Fiscal Year 2012.

In his 2012 Budget Request, President Obama proposed to merge the National Asthma Control Program with the Healthy Homes/Lead Poisoning Prevention Program--and then cut their combined budgets by over 50 percent. Slashing funding for the National Asthma Control Program would have a devastating effect on the work being done across the United States to save lives and help people live with their asthma. In addition to eliminating community-based programs, at least half of the school-based asthma programs across the country would be eliminated.

Asthma remains a significant public health problem in the United States and one that cannot be ignored. It is estimated that almost 25 million Americans currently have asthma, of whom 7.1 million are children. Asthma is the third leading cause of hospitalization among children under the age of 15 and is a leading cause of school absences from chronic disease--accounting for over 10.5 million lost school days in 2008. Asthma claimed the lives of 3,445 Americans in 2009, approximately nine people per day.

Since it was created in 1999, the National Asthma Control Program has worked to coordinate the public health response to asthma control, making great strides in working through the states to collect data and ensuring patients understand how to manage their disease so they have fewer asthma attacks. Since 1999, deaths and hospitalizations due to asthma have decreased even though the number of Americans diagnosed with asthma has risen.

While these are difficult economic and fiscal times, severely cutting the National Asthma Control Program and other public health programs is fiscally unwise. Asthma already costs our healthcare system more than $50.1 billion annually and indirect costs from lost productivity add another $5.9 billion, for a total of $56 billion dollars annually. Cutting the National Asthma Control Program and its grants to states could increase hospitalizations due to asthma, the number of days children miss because of their asthma and add additional costs from uncontrolled asthma to an already overburdened Medicaid system.

Please fight to preserve CDC's National Asthma Control Program and its funding at $31 million for Fiscal Year 2012.

Thank you.

Sincerely
[Your Name]
[Your Address]
[City, State ZIP]