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Stop the Use of Exotic and Wild Animals in Traveling Performances and Circuses

Stop the Use of Exotic and Wild Animals in Traveling Performances and Circuses

Name: Traveling Exotic Animal and Public Safety Protection Act

Bill Number: HR 1759

Traveling circuses are detrimental to animal welfare because of the adverse effects of captivity, training and transport. Due to severe confinement and the restriction of natural behaviors, animals used in traveling circuses suffer and are prone to health, behavioral, and psychological problems. With the passage of HR 1759, Congress aims to amend the Animal Welfare Act to restrict the use of exotic and wild animals in traveling circuses and traveling exhibitions. Although Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Baily Circus has folded, there are 25 other travelling circuses in the U.S.—according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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Please Put an End to the Cruel Use of Wild and Exotic Animals in Traveling Performances

Dear [Decision Maker],

I am writing to ask your support for legislation, HR 1759, which would ban the use of exotic and wild animals in traveling circuses and traveling exhibitions. Investigations have shown that both human and animal welfare are unacceptably compromised due to severe confinement and the daily brutality of life on the road with a traveling circus. Stressed animals housed in close quarters have proven to be a public safety hazard, which could lead to escaped animals maiming and even killing members of the public, including children.

In addition to the threat to public safety, this bill addresses the cruelty towards wild and exotic performing animals that are very much part of circus life. An animal's training often involves beatings, restraint and sedation to make the animal obey commands at performances. Animals kept in such conditions frequently display abnormal behaviors such as rocking, swaying, pacing and self-mutilation.

Efforts to charge circuses with animal cruelty violations have been unsuccessful, in part due to the mobile and transitory nature of traveling performances. Law enforcement officers cannot properly monitor the conditions of the animals or follow up on previous infractions by a traveling circus once it moves on.

Although Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Baily Circus has folded, there are 25 other travelling circuses in the U.S.--according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Thank you for your consideration. I hope that you will give your full support to the passage of this legislation.

Sincerely,
[Your Name]
[Your Address]
[City, State ZIP]